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Subject: Re: Fragmentation of the European network science field
From: Philip Leifeld <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:Philip Leifeld <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Fri, 10 Dec 2010 16:27:18 +0100
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*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

Hi Balasz!

Very interesting - thanks for sharing this!

It would be interesting to see the names of the persons.

Beyond the obvious disciplinary boundaries: do you think the 
fragmentation is caused by nationality or seniority?

Thanks,
Philip

On 10.12.2010 15:43, Balazs Vedres wrote:
> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org ***** Dear all,
>
> We have preliminary findings about the fragmentation of the European
> network science field:
>
> http://www.ceu.hu/cns/ans/euns
>
> With Marco Scotti and Mariya Ivancheva we mapped the co-authorship
> network of European network science. We included all scientists with a
> European affiliation who presented a paper at the INSNA Sunbelt
> conferences or the NetSci annual conferences between 2005 and 2008 - 532
> scholars. We looked up the top 5 most cited publications of these
> scholars, and included their co-authors in a dataset, that ultimately
> contains 3543 persons authoring 1689 publications.
>
> We simulated scenarios when European authors are free to choose any
> co-author, from any country or field. The only contraint that we kept is
> that the number of authors, the number of publications, and the
> distribution of authors per publications needs to stay the same. In the
> one thousand simulations the average number of components was 139, with
> a range of 98 to 166. The observed co-authorship network has 240
> components, a high number that is not likely to arise by chance. The
> bottom panel shows the relative size of the largest component to the
> size of the network. In a fragmented system the largest component does
> not gather a large fraction of the network. In our simulations the
> largest component on the average gathers 91.2% of all nodes, with a
> range between 89.1% and 93.4%. The observed proportion of the largest
> component is 18.6%, way smaller that we would expect in an "unbiased"
> system.
>
> Does anyone have comparable data on the US networks field?
>
>
> Best
> Balazs
> _____________________________________________________________________
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-- 
Philip Leifeld
Max Planck Institute for     | +49 (0) 1577 6830349 (mobile)
Research on Collective Goods | +49 (0) 228 91416-73 (phone)
MaxNetAging Doctoral Fellow  | +49 (0) 228 91416-62 (fax)
Kurt-Schumacher-Str. 10      | [log in to unmask]
53113 Bonn, Germany          | http://www.philipleifeld.de

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