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Subject: Correction
From: James Fowler <[log in to unmask]>
Reply-To:James Fowler <[log in to unmask]>
Date:Wed, 8 Jun 2011 21:35:18 -0700
Content-Type:text/plain
Parts/Attachments:
Parts/Attachments

text/plain (1792 lines)


*****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****

I'd like to correct a factual error in a post published on SOCNET  
yesterday (the poster shall remain nameless).

A poster cites a claim about the Framingham Heart Study social network  
data ("1. The data are not available to others.") that is easily  
refuted by a simple Google search.

Here is the 3rd item for me in a Google search using the terms  
"framingham social network data":

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/projects/gap/cgi-bin/study.cgi?study_id=phs000153.v1.p1

And notice that the release date was June 26, 2009, well before the  
first edition of the paper the poster cites.

I also have doubts about the rest of the claims.  For more, please see  
these pieces:

http://jhfowler.ucsd.edu/estimating_peer_effects.pdf
http://jhfowler.ucsd.edu/examining_dynamic_social_networks.pdf

For the best work on limitations of observational network studies, see  
Cosma Shalizi, Sinan Aral, and Hans Noel and Brendan Nyhan's work.

There is really no reason to distort the truth.  To quote one of my  
favorite movies: "We are all in this together."

Best,
james

James H. Fowler
Professor of Medical Genetics and Political Science
UC San Diego
http://jhfowler.ucsd.edu

CONNECTED
http://connectedthebook.com





On Jun 8, 2011, at 9:00 PM, SOCNET automatic digest system wrote:

> There are 11 messages totalling 1466 lines in this issue.
>
> Topics of the day:
>
>  1. he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social-Network  
> Analysis (6)
>  2. Social network analysts in SE Wisconsin?
>  3. Program for Political Networks Conference and Workshops (2)
>  4. Network analysis workshops in the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program ---  
> hurry,
>     most courses are closed/filled
>  5. Looking for papers
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 08:57:14 +0300
> From:    Ilan Talmud <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social- 
> Network Analysis
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
> --------------000904050906060405050101
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
>
> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed
> Social-Network Analysis," /Statistics, Politics, and Policy/: Vol. 2:
> Iss. 1, Article 2.
> *DOI:* 10.2202/2151-7509.1024
> *Available at:* http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract
>
> The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually inadvertent,  
> not
> intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent  
> papers by
> Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments for the
> transmission via social networks of various personal characteristics,
> including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and loneliness. Those
> papers also assert that such influence extends to three degrees of
> separation in social networks. We shall show that these conclusions do
> not follow from Christakis and Fowler's statistical analyses. In fact,
> their studies even provide some evidence against the existence of such
> transmission. The errors that we expose arose, in part, because the
> assumptions behind the statistical procedures used were insufficiently
> examined, not only by the authors, but also by the reviewers. Our
> examples are instructive because the practitioners are highly reputed,
> their results have received enormous popular attention, and the  
> journals
> that published their studies are among the most respected in the  
> world.
> An educational bonus emerges from the difficulty we report in getting
> our critique published. We discuss the relevance of this episode to
> understanding statistical literacy and the role of scientific  
> review, as
> well as to reforming statistics education
>
> ... summarizing the major problems with C&F's studies:
> 1. The data are not available to others.
> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.
> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data and
> the conclusions.
> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.
> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable  
> estimates do
> not show
> the proposed differences.
> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
> homophily,
> environment,
> and induction.
> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily than  
> by
> induction.
>
> --
> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
> University of Haifa
> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>
> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --------------000904050906060405050101
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
> <html>
> <head>
>
> <meta http-equiv="content-type" content="text/html;  
> charset=ISO-8859-1">
> </head>
> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
> <br>
> Lyons, Russell
> (2011)
> "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social-Network
> Analysis,"
> <em>Statistics, Politics, and Policy</em>:
> Vol. 2:
> Iss.
> 1, Article 2.
> <br>
> <strong>DOI:</strong> 10.2202/2151-7509.1024<br>
> <strong>Available at:</strong>
> <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract 
> ">http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract</a>
> <div id="abstract" class="element">
> <p>The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually inadvertent,
> not intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent
> papers by Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments for
> the transmission via social networks of various personal
> characteristics, including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and
> loneliness. Those papers also assert that such influence extends to
> three degrees of separation in social networks. We shall show that
> these conclusions do not follow from Christakis and Fowler's
> statistical analyses. In fact, their studies even provide some  
> evidence
> against the existence of such transmission. The errors that we expose
> arose, in part, because the assumptions behind the statistical
> procedures used were insufficiently examined, not only by the authors,
> but also by the reviewers. Our examples are instructive because the
> practitioners are highly reputed, their results have received enormous
> popular attention, and the journals that published their studies are
> among the most respected in the world. An educational bonus emerges
> from the difficulty we report in getting our critique published. We
> discuss the relevance of this episode to understanding statistical
> literacy and the role of scientific review, as well as to reforming
> statistics education</p>
> </div>
> ... summarizing the major problems with C&amp;F&#8217;s studies:<br>
> 1. The data are not available to others.<br>
> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.<br>
> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data and
> the conclusions.<br>
> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.<br>
> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable estimates
> do not show<br>
> the proposed differences.<br>
> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
> homophily,
> environment,<br>
> and induction.<br>
> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily than  
> by
> induction.<br>
> <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">--
> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
> University of Haifa
> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>
> <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://soc.haifa.ac.il/ 
> ~talmud/">http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/</a>
> </pre>
> </body>
> </html>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --------------000904050906060405050101--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 11:07:45 +0200
> From:    =?ISO-8859-2?Q?Micha=B3_Bojanowski?= <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social- 
> Network Analysis
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Thanks. It is an interesting article indeed
> (in fact it was available trough ArXiv since July 2010,
> http://arxiv.org/abs/1007.2876).
>
> The issue revolved into an interesting debate. Partly covered here
> http://www.slate.com/id/2250102/
> I blogged about it too
> http://brokeringclosure.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/social-contagion-maybe-not/
>
> Make sure you read contributions from both "sides", including
>
> Fowler, James H. and Nicholas A. Christakis. 2008b. „Estimating peer
> effects on health in social networks: A response to Cohen-Cole and
> Fletcher and Trogdon, Nonnemaker, and Pais.‰ Journal of Health Eco-
> nomics 27:1400ˆ1405.
>
> and also a recent related paper by Noel & Nyhan
>
> "The „Unfriending‰ Problem The Consequences of Homophily in  
> Friendship
> Retention for Causal Estimates of Social Influence"
> www-personal.umich.edu/~bnyhan/unfriending.pdf
>
>
>
> On Wed, Jun 8, 2011 at 7:57 AM, Ilan Talmud <[log in to unmask]>  
> wrote:
>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via  
>> Flawed
>> Social-Network Analysis," Statistics, Politics, and Policy: Vol. 2:  
>> Iss. 1,
>> Article 2.
>> DOI: 10.2202/2151-7509.1024
>> Available at: http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract
>>
>> The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually inadvertent,  
>> not
>> intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent  
>> papers by
>> Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments for the
>> transmission via social networks of various personal characteristics,
>> including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and loneliness.  
>> Those
>> papers also assert that such influence extends to three degrees of
>> separation in social networks. We shall show that these conclusions  
>> do not
>> follow from Christakis and Fowler's statistical analyses. In fact,  
>> their
>> studies even provide some evidence against the existence of such
>> transmission. The errors that we expose arose, in part, because the
>> assumptions behind the statistical procedures used were  
>> insufficiently
>> examined, not only by the authors, but also by the reviewers. Our  
>> examples
>> are instructive because the practitioners are highly reputed, their  
>> results
>> have received enormous popular attention, and the journals that  
>> published
>> their studies are among the most respected in the world. An  
>> educational
>> bonus emerges from the difficulty we report in getting our critique
>> published. We discuss the relevance of this episode to understanding
>> statistical literacy and the role of scientific review, as well as to
>> reforming statistics education
>>
>> ... summarizing the major problems with C&F‚s studies:
>> 1. The data are not available to others.
>> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.
>> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data  
>> and the
>> conclusions.
>> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.
>> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable  
>> estimates do not
>> show
>> the proposed differences.
>> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
>> homophily,
>> environment,
>> and induction.
>> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily  
>> than by
>> induction.
>>
>> --
>> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
>> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
>> University of Haifa
>> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
>> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
>> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>>
>> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________________ 
>>  SOCNET
>> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social  
>> network
>> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email  
>> message to
>> [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in  
>> the body of
>> the message.
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 12:23:58 +0300
> From:    Ilan Talmud <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social- 
> Network Analysis
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Thanks.  Informative indeed.
>
> MichaÅ≠ Bojanowski wrote:
>> Thanks. It is an interesting article indeed
>> (in fact it was available trough ArXiv since July 2010,
>> http://arxiv.org/abs/1007.2876).
>>
>> The issue revolved into an interesting debate. Partly covered here
>> http://www.slate.com/id/2250102/
>> I blogged about it too
>> http://brokeringclosure.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/social-contagion-maybe-not/
>>
>> Make sure you read contributions from both "sides", including
>>
>> Fowler, James H. and Nicholas A. Christakis. 2008b.  
>> ╲Estimating peer
>> effects on health in social networks: A response to Cohen-Cole and
>> Fletcher and Trogdon, Nonnemaker, and Pais.╡ Journal of Health  
>> Eco-
>> nomics 27:1400â•„1405.
>>
>> and also a recent related paper by Noel&  Nyhan
>>
>> "The ╲Unfriending╡ Problem The Consequences of Homophily  
>> in Friendship
>> Retention for Causal Estimates of Social Influence"
>> www-personal.umich.edu/~bnyhan/unfriending.pdf
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 8, 2011 at 7:57 AM, Ilan  
>> Talmud<[log in to unmask]>  wrote:
>>
>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via  
>>> Flawed
>>> Social-Network Analysis," Statistics, Politics, and Policy: Vol.  
>>> 2: Iss. 1,
>>> Article 2.
>>> DOI: 10.2202/2151-7509.1024
>>> Available at: http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract
>>>
>>> The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually  
>>> inadvertent, not
>>> intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent  
>>> papers by
>>> Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments for the
>>> transmission via social networks of various personal  
>>> characteristics,
>>> including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and loneliness.  
>>> Those
>>> papers also assert that such influence extends to three degrees of
>>> separation in social networks. We shall show that these  
>>> conclusions do not
>>> follow from Christakis and Fowler's statistical analyses. In fact,  
>>> their
>>> studies even provide some evidence against the existence of such
>>> transmission. The errors that we expose arose, in part, because the
>>> assumptions behind the statistical procedures used were  
>>> insufficiently
>>> examined, not only by the authors, but also by the reviewers. Our  
>>> examples
>>> are instructive because the practitioners are highly reputed,  
>>> their results
>>> have received enormous popular attention, and the journals that  
>>> published
>>> their studies are among the most respected in the world. An  
>>> educational
>>> bonus emerges from the difficulty we report in getting our critique
>>> published. We discuss the relevance of this episode to understanding
>>> statistical literacy and the role of scientific review, as well as  
>>> to
>>> reforming statistics education
>>>
>>> ... summarizing the major problems with C&Fâ•˙s studies:
>>> 1. The data are not available to others.
>>> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.
>>> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data  
>>> and the
>>> conclusions.
>>> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.
>>> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable  
>>> estimates do not
>>> show
>>> the proposed differences.
>>> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
>>> homophily,
>>> environment,
>>> and induction.
>>> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily  
>>> than by
>>> induction.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
>>> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
>>> University of Haifa
>>> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
>>> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
>>> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>>>
>>> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>>>
>>> _____________________________________________________________________ 
>>>  SOCNET
>>> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social  
>>> network
>>> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email  
>>> message to
>>> [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in  
>>> the body of
>>> the message.
>>>
>>
>>
>
> --
> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
> University of Haifa
> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>
> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 12:03:37 +0200
> From:    Christophe Prieur <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social- 
> Network Analysis
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Very interesting topic imho.
>
>> Make sure you read contributions from both "sides", including [...]
>
> MichaÅ≠, maybe you could add these references as another update of  
> your blog post.
>
> _
>  Christophe Prieur,                                               [log in to unmask]
>  Liafa, Université Paris-Diderot                           http://liafa.fr/~prieu 
> r/
>  [user experience research, social networks, (large) graph algorithms]
>
>
>
>
> Le 8 juin 2011 à  11:07, MichaÅ≠ Bojanowski a écrit :
>
>> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>>
>> Thanks. It is an interesting article indeed
>> (in fact it was available trough ArXiv since July 2010,
>> http://arxiv.org/abs/1007.2876).
>>
>> The issue revolved into an interesting debate. Partly covered here
>> http://www.slate.com/id/2250102/
>> I blogged about it too
>> http://brokeringclosure.wordpress.com/2010/07/28/social-contagion-maybe-not/
>>
>> Make sure you read contributions from both "sides", including
>>
>> Fowler, James H. and Nicholas A. Christakis. 2008b.  
>> ╲Estimating peer
>> effects on health in social networks: A response to Cohen-Cole and
>> Fletcher and Trogdon, Nonnemaker, and Pais.╡ Journal of Health  
>> Eco-
>> nomics 27:1400â•„1405.
>>
>> and also a recent related paper by Noel & Nyhan
>>
>> "The ╲Unfriending╡ Problem The Consequences of Homophily  
>> in Friendship
>> Retention for Causal Estimates of Social Influence"
>> www-personal.umich.edu/~bnyhan/unfriending.pdf
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jun 8, 2011 at 7:57 AM, Ilan Talmud  
>> <[log in to unmask]> wrote:
>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via  
>>> Flawed
>>> Social-Network Analysis," Statistics, Politics, and Policy: Vol.  
>>> 2: Iss. 1,
>>> Article 2.
>>> DOI: 10.2202/2151-7509.1024
>>> Available at: http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract
>>>
>>> The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually  
>>> inadvertent, not
>>> intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent  
>>> papers by
>>> Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments for the
>>> transmission via social networks of various personal  
>>> characteristics,
>>> including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and loneliness.  
>>> Those
>>> papers also assert that such influence extends to three degrees of
>>> separation in social networks. We shall show that these  
>>> conclusions do not
>>> follow from Christakis and Fowler's statistical analyses. In fact,  
>>> their
>>> studies even provide some evidence against the existence of such
>>> transmission. The errors that we expose arose, in part, because the
>>> assumptions behind the statistical procedures used were  
>>> insufficiently
>>> examined, not only by the authors, but also by the reviewers. Our  
>>> examples
>>> are instructive because the practitioners are highly reputed,  
>>> their results
>>> have received enormous popular attention, and the journals that  
>>> published
>>> their studies are among the most respected in the world. An  
>>> educational
>>> bonus emerges from the difficulty we report in getting our critique
>>> published. We discuss the relevance of this episode to understanding
>>> statistical literacy and the role of scientific review, as well as  
>>> to
>>> reforming statistics education
>>>
>>> ... summarizing the major problems with C&Fâ•˙s studies:
>>> 1. The data are not available to others.
>>> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.
>>> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data  
>>> and the
>>> conclusions.
>>> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.
>>> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable  
>>> estimates do not
>>> show
>>> the proposed differences.
>>> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
>>> homophily,
>>> environment,
>>> and induction.
>>> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily  
>>> than by
>>> induction.
>>>
>>> --
>>> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
>>> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
>>> University of Haifa
>>> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
>>> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
>>> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>>>
>>> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>>>
>>> _____________________________________________________________________ 
>>>  SOCNET
>>> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social  
>>> network
>>> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email  
>>> message to
>>> [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in  
>>> the body of
>>> the message.
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________________
>> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
>> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
>> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
>> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 11:02:03 -0500
> From:    "Franco, Zeno" <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Social network analysts in SE Wisconsin?
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Folks,
>
> I am trying to identify someone with expertise in social network  
> analysis in the Milwaukee area, or SE Wisconsin more generally to  
> act as a consultant.  This is for a community based / public health  
> project that has advanced to full proposal phase for a 5 year grant  
> opportunity.  We are looking to write in an individual for a small %  
> FTE over life of grant.  Optimally, this would be a faculty member  
> locally with a couple of graduate students who can spend some time  
> scraping data from social networking sites, etc. Other arrangements  
> (e.g. consulting firm) might work as well. However, we've been  
> having difficulty identifying appropriate person -- so reaching out  
> to this list.  Any ideas, connections, etc. would be helpful.  We'd  
> like to keep this regional if we can just to make the funder happy.
>
> Best,
>
> Zeno
>
> Zeno Franco, PhD
> HRSA Post Doctoral Fellow
> Department of Family & Community Medicine
> Medical College of Wisconsin
> (414) 456-8634 (direct)
> (414) 557-7940 (pager)
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 20:29:56 +0300
> From:    Ilan Talmud <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social- 
> Network Analysis
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
> --------------060205040405080208070001
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Try this link:
> http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2/?sending=11427
>
> Richard Rothenberg wrote:
>> Ilan, the link didn't work for me.  Could you check it and let the
>> list know if it is correct?
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Rich Rothenberg
>>
>> On 6/8/2011 1:57 AM, Ilan Talmud wrote:
>>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>>> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via
>>> Flawed Social-Network Analysis," /Statistics, Politics, and Policy/:
>>> Vol. 2: Iss. 1, Article 2.
>>> *DOI:* 10.2202/2151-7509.1024
>>> *Available at:* http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract
>>>
>>> The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually inadvertent,
>>> not intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent
>>> papers by Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments
>>> for the transmission via social networks of various personal
>>> characteristics, including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness,  
>>> and
>>> loneliness. Those papers also assert that such influence extends to
>>> three degrees of separation in social networks. We shall show that
>>> these conclusions do not follow from Christakis and Fowler's
>>> statistical analyses. In fact, their studies even provide some
>>> evidence against the existence of such transmission. The errors that
>>> we expose arose, in part, because the assumptions behind the
>>> statistical procedures used were insufficiently examined, not only  
>>> by
>>> the authors, but also by the reviewers. Our examples are instructive
>>> because the practitioners are highly reputed, their results have
>>> received enormous popular attention, and the journals that published
>>> their studies are among the most respected in the world. An
>>> educational bonus emerges from the difficulty we report in getting
>>> our critique published. We discuss the relevance of this episode to
>>> understanding statistical literacy and the role of scientific  
>>> review,
>>> as well as to reforming statistics education
>>>
>>> ... summarizing the major problems with C&F's studies:
>>> 1. The data are not available to others.
>>> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.
>>> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data  
>>> and
>>> the conclusions.
>>> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.
>>> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable  
>>> estimates
>>> do not show
>>> the proposed differences.
>>> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among
>>> homophily, environment,
>>> and induction.
>>> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily than
>>> by induction.
>>> --
>>> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
>>> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
>>> University of Haifa
>>> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
>>> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
>>> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>>>
>>> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>>>
>>> _____________________________________________________________________
>>> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for  
>>> social
>>> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an
>>> email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
>>> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>>
>> --
>> Richard Rothenberg MD MPH
>> Professor, Institute of Public Health
>> Georgia State University
>> Editor, Annals of Epidemiology
>> Urban Life Building Rm 857
>> 140 Decatur St.
>> Atlanta, GA 30303
>> email:[log in to unmask]
>> Phone: 404-413-1144
>> FAX: 404-413-1140
>
> --
> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
> University of Haifa
> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>
> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --------------060205040405080208070001
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> <!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
> <html>
> <head>
>  <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
> http-equiv="Content-Type">
> </head>
> <body bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000">
> <tt>Try this link:<br>
> <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2/?sending=11427 
> ">http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2/?sending=11427</a><br>
> </tt><br>
> Richard Rothenberg wrote:
> <blockquote cite="mid:[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
>  <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
> http-equiv="Content-Type">
> Ilan, the link didn't work for me.&nbsp; Could you check it and let  
> the list
> know if it is correct?<br>
>  <br>
> Thanks.<br>
>  <br>
> Rich Rothenberg<br>
>  <br>
> On 6/8/2011 1:57 AM, Ilan Talmud wrote:
>  <blockquote cite="mid:[log in to unmask]" type="cite">
>    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type"
> content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1">
> ***** To join INSNA, visit <a moz-do-not-send="true"
> class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.insna.org">http://www.insna.org 
> </a>
> ***** <br>
> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed
> Social-Network Analysis," <em>Statistics, Politics, and Policy</em>:
> Vol. 2: Iss. 1, Article 2. <br>
>    <strong>DOI:</strong> 10.2202/2151-7509.1024<br>
>    <strong>Available at:</strong> <a moz-do-not-send="true"
> class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
> href="http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract">http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract 
> </a>
>    <div id="abstract" class="element">
>    <p>The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually
> inadvertent, not intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series
> of recent papers by Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical
> arguments for the transmission via social networks of various personal
> characteristics, including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and
> loneliness. Those papers also assert that such influence extends to
> three degrees of separation in social networks. We shall show that
> these conclusions do not follow from Christakis and Fowler's
> statistical analyses. In fact, their studies even provide some  
> evidence
> against the existence of such transmission. The errors that we expose
> arose, in part, because the assumptions behind the statistical
> procedures used were insufficiently examined, not only by the authors,
> but also by the reviewers. Our examples are instructive because the
> practitioners are highly reputed, their results have received enormous
> popular attention, and the journals that published their studies are
> among the most respected in the world. An educational bonus emerges
> from the difficulty we report in getting our critique published. We
> discuss the relevance of this episode to understanding statistical
> literacy and the role of scientific review, as well as to reforming
> statistics education</p>
>    </div>
> ... summarizing the major problems with C&amp;F&#8217;s studies:<br>
> 1. The data are not available to others.<br>
> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.<br>
> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data and
> the conclusions.<br>
> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.<br>
> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable estimates
> do not show<br>
> the proposed differences.<br>
> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
> homophily,
> environment,<br>
> and induction.<br>
> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily than  
> by
> induction.<br>
>    <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">--
> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
> University of Haifa
> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>
> <a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-freetext"
> href="http://soc.haifa.ac.il/%7Etalmud/">http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/ 
> </a>
>    </pre>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (<a moz-do-not-send="true"
> class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.insna.org">http://www.insna.org 
> </a>).
> To unsubscribe, send an email message to <a moz-do-not-send="true"
> class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated"  
> href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</a>
> containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message. </ 
> blockquote>
>  <br>
>  <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">--
> Richard Rothenberg MD MPH
> Professor, Institute of Public Health
> Georgia State University
> Editor, Annals of Epidemiology
> Urban Life Building Rm 857
> 140 Decatur St.
> Atlanta, GA 30303
> email: <a moz-do-not-send="true" class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated"
> href="mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</a>
> Phone: 404-413-1144
> FAX: 404-413-1140</pre>
> </blockquote>
> <br>
> <pre class="moz-signature" cols="72">--
> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
> University of Haifa
> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>
> <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://soc.haifa.ac.il/ 
> ~talmud/">http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/</a>
> </pre>
> </body>
> </html>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --------------060205040405080208070001--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 11:19:19 -0700
> From:    Michael Heaney <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Program for Political Networks Conference and Workshops
>
> --0-1428195267-1307557159=:98565
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Dear Networkers,
>
> The final program is now available for the 4th Annual Political  
> Networks Co=
> nference and Workshops, to be held at the University of Michigan,  
> June 14-1=
> 8, 2011.
>
> The program is available here:
>
> http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mheaney/Program.pdf
>
> Best,
>
> Michael
> =A0
> --=20
> Michael T. Heaney, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies & Political Science
> University of Michigan
> 722 Dennison Building
> 500 Church Street
> Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042
>
> Cell phone: 202-236-3369
> E-mail: [log in to unmask]
> http://www.umich.edu/~mheaney/=20
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --0-1428195267-1307557159=:98565
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> <table cellspacing=3D"0" cellpadding=3D"0" border=3D"0" ><tr><td  
> valign=3D"=
> top" style=3D"font: inherit;"><DIV>Dear Networkers,<BR><BR>The final  
> progra=
> m is now available for the 4th Annual Political Networks Conference  
> and Wor=
> kshops, to be held at the University of Michigan, June 14-18,  
> 2011.<BR><BR>=
> The program is available here:<BR><BR><A href=3D"http://www-personal.umich 
> .=
> edu/~mheaney/Program.pdf" target=3D_blank>http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mh=
> eaney/Program.pdf</A><BR><BR>Best,<BR><BR>Michael</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>-- <BR>Michael T. Heaney, Ph.D.<BR>Assistant Professor of  
> Organization=
> al Studies &amp; Political Science<BR>University of Michigan<BR>722  
> Denniso=
> n Building<BR>500 Church Street<BR>Ann Arbor, MI  
> 48109-1042<BR><BR>Cell pho=
> ne: 202-236-3369<BR>E-mail: <A href=3D"#" nicetitle=3D"New Message  
> to mhean=
> [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</A><BR><A href=3D"http://www.umich.edu/~mhe=
> aney/" target=3D_blank>http://www.umich.edu/~mheaney/</A> <BR><BR></ 
> DIV></t=
> d></tr></table>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
> --0-1428195267-1307557159=:98565--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 11:19:42 -0700
> From:    Michael Heaney <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Program for Political Networks Conference and Workshops
>
> --0-1154683426-1307557182=:98565
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Dear Networkers,
>
> The final program is now available for the 4th Annual Political  
> Networks Co=
> nference and Workshops, to be held at the University of Michigan,  
> June 14-1=
> 8, 2011.
>
> The program is available here:
>
> http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mheaney/Program.pdf
>
> Best,
>
> Michael
> =A0
> --=20
> Michael T. Heaney, Ph.D.
> Assistant Professor of Organizational Studies & Political Science
> University of Michigan
> 722 Dennison Building
> 500 Church Street
> Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1042
>
> Cell phone: 202-236-3369
> E-mail: [log in to unmask]
> http://www.umich.edu/~mheaney/=20
>
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --0-1154683426-1307557182=:98565
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=iso-8859-1
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> <table cellspacing=3D"0" cellpadding=3D"0" border=3D"0" ><tr><td  
> valign=3D"=
> top" style=3D"font: inherit;"><DIV>Dear Networkers,<BR><BR>The final  
> progra=
> m is now available for the 4th Annual Political Networks Conference  
> and Wor=
> kshops, to be held at the University of Michigan, June 14-18,  
> 2011.<BR><BR>=
> The program is available here:<BR><BR><A href=3D"http://www-personal.umich 
> .=
> edu/~mheaney/Program.pdf" target=3D_blank>http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mh=
> eaney/Program.pdf</A><BR><BR>Best,<BR><BR>Michael</DIV>
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
> <DIV>-- <BR>Michael T. Heaney, Ph.D.<BR>Assistant Professor of  
> Organization=
> al Studies &amp; Political Science<BR>University of Michigan<BR>722  
> Denniso=
> n Building<BR>500 Church Street<BR>Ann Arbor, MI  
> 48109-1042<BR><BR>Cell pho=
> ne: 202-236-3369<BR>E-mail: <A href=3D"#" nicetitle=3D"New Message  
> to mhean=
> [log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</A><BR><A href=3D"http://www.umich.edu/~mhe=
> aney/" target=3D_blank>http://www.umich.edu/~mheaney/</A> <BR><BR></ 
> DIV></t=
> d></tr></table>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
> --0-1154683426-1307557182=:98565--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 21:26:52 +0200
> From:    Moses Boudourides <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Re: he Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via Flawed Social- 
> Network Analysis
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Hi,
>
> One should also not forget Cosma Rohilla Shalizi's & Andrew C. Thomas'
> Homophily and Contagion Are Generically Confounded in Observational
> Social Network Studies:
>
> http://arxiv.org/abs/1004.4704
>
> Best,
>
> --Moses
>
>
> On Wed, Jun 8, 2011 at 7:29 PM, Ilan Talmud <[log in to unmask]>  
> wrote:
>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>> Try this link:
>> http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2/?sending=11427
>>
>> Richard Rothenberg wrote:
>>
>> Ilan, the link didn't work for me.  Could you check it and let the  
>> list know
>> if it is correct?
>>
>> Thanks.
>>
>> Rich Rothenberg
>>
>> On 6/8/2011 1:57 AM, Ilan Talmud wrote:
>>
>> ***** To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org *****
>> Lyons, Russell (2011) "The Spread of Evidence-Poor Medicine via  
>> Flawed
>> Social-Network Analysis," Statistics, Politics, and Policy: Vol. 2:  
>> Iss. 1,
>> Article 2.
>> DOI: 10.2202/2151-7509.1024
>> Available at: http://www.bepress.com/spp/vol2/iss1/2Abstract
>>
>> The chronic widespread misuse of statistics is usually inadvertent,  
>> not
>> intentional. We find cautionary examples in a series of recent  
>> papers by
>> Christakis and Fowler that advance statistical arguments for the
>> transmission via social networks of various personal characteristics,
>> including obesity, smoking cessation, happiness, and loneliness.  
>> Those
>> papers also assert that such influence extends to three degrees of
>> separation in social networks. We shall show that these conclusions  
>> do not
>> follow from Christakis and Fowler's statistical analyses. In fact,  
>> their
>> studies even provide some evidence against the existence of such
>> transmission. The errors that we expose arose, in part, because the
>> assumptions behind the statistical procedures used were  
>> insufficiently
>> examined, not only by the authors, but also by the reviewers. Our  
>> examples
>> are instructive because the practitioners are highly reputed, their  
>> results
>> have received enormous popular attention, and the journals that  
>> published
>> their studies are among the most respected in the world. An  
>> educational
>> bonus emerges from the difficulty we report in getting our critique
>> published. We discuss the relevance of this episode to understanding
>> statistical literacy and the role of scientific review, as well as to
>> reforming statistics education
>>
>> ... summarizing the major problems with C&F‚s studies:
>> 1. The data are not available to others.
>> 2. The unavailable data are sparse for friendships.
>> 3. The models used to analyze the sparse data contradict the data  
>> and the
>> conclusions.
>> 4. The method used to estimate the dubious models does not apply.
>> 5. The statistical significance tests from the questionable  
>> estimates do not
>> show
>> the proposed differences.
>> 6. The wrongly proposed differences do not distinguish among  
>> homophily,
>> environment,
>> and induction.
>> 7. Associations at a distance are better explained by homophily  
>> than by
>> induction.
>>
>> --
>> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
>> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
>> University of Haifa
>> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
>> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
>> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>>
>> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>>
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________________ 
>>  SOCNET
>> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social  
>> network
>> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email  
>> message to
>> [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in  
>> the body of
>> the message.
>>
>> --
>> Richard Rothenberg MD MPH
>> Professor, Institute of Public Health
>> Georgia State University
>> Editor, Annals of Epidemiology
>> Urban Life Building Rm 857
>> 140 Decatur St.
>> Atlanta, GA 30303
>> email: [log in to unmask]
>> Phone: 404-413-1144
>> FAX: 404-413-1140
>>
>> --
>> Prof. Ilan Talmud, Ph.D.
>> Head, Economic Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology,
>> University of Haifa
>> Phones: 972-4-8240992 (office direct)
>> 972-4-8240995 / 8249505 (secretaries)
>> (cell) 972-522-220914 Fax: 972-4-8240819
>>
>> http://soc.haifa.ac.il/~talmud/
>>
>> _____________________________________________________________________ 
>>  SOCNET
>> is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social  
>> network
>> researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send an email  
>> message to
>> [log in to unmask] containing the line UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in  
>> the body of
>> the message.
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Wed, 8 Jun 2011 17:05:18 -0400
> From:    Stanley Wasserman <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Network analysis workshops in the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program  
> --- hurry, most courses are closed/filled
>
> --Apple-Mail-25-694920916
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
> Content-Type: text/plain;
>        charset=us-ascii
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
>
>
> Network analysis workshops in the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program
>
>
> courses are almost filled .... a few spots remain (see below) .....
>
>
>
> =20
>
> Greetings from the ICPSR Summer Program!
>
> As you know, network analysis is a topic that is receiving an  
> enormous =
> amount of attention in the social and behavioral sciences. This =
> strategy, and the associated methodological tools, for analyzing =
> relationships between entities have proven to be useful in a wide =
> variety of research contexts,   from many substantive areas. Because  
> of =
> the broad interest in network analysis that exists within the  
> scholarly =
> community, we wanted to let you know about the courses on this topic =
> that we will be offering in the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program.
>
> This year, we will be offering a total of five different courses, =
> varying from introductory to advanced levels. The courses will be  
> held =
> in four different locations, and they range in length from three  
> days to =
> four weeks.
>
> =20
>
> Three of the workshops provide basic introductions to the  
> methodological =
> techniques associated with network analysis. These classes assume  
> that =
> participants have a first course background in statistics, and no  
> prior =
> experience with network analysis.   The first two are a week long,  
> while =
> the last is a full four-week ICPSR course:
>
> =20
>
>     Network Analysis: An Introduction. The instructor for this  
> course =
> is Stanley Wasserman, from Indiana University. This workshop has  
> been =
> offered for more than 25 years by ICPSR, and focuses on data, =
> statistics, and models.    The course is an intensive five-day  
> workshop =
> that will be taught in Ann Arbor, Michigan, June 13-17, 2011.   =20
>
> course closed
>
>
>
>     Social Network Analysis: An Introduction. The instructor for  
> this =
> course is Katherine Faust, from the University of California,  
> Irvine. =
> The course is an intensive five-day workshop, taught in Chapel Hill, =
> North Carolina, July 18-22, 2011.
>
> course closed
>
>
>
>
>
>     Network Analysis. The instructor for this course is Ann  
> McCranie, =
> from Indiana University.     Participants will learn about data =
> collection and preparation and methods for analysis of individual =
> actors, subgroup, and network properties; statistical models will be =
> introduced in the last week of the course.  The course will be  
> taught =
> during the first four-week session of the ICPSR Summer Program, June =
> 20-July 15, 2011, in Ann Arbor, Michigan.
>
> course closed
>
> =20
>
> =20
>
> The last two workshops cover more advanced topics in the standard =
> methods of network analysis. They assume that participants have had =
> exposure to, and some experience with, the methodology of network =
> analysis:
>
>     Network Analysis: A Second Course. The instructors for this  
> course =
> are Stanley Wasserman, from Indiana University and Hank Green from  
> the =
> RAND Graduate School.  This course will focus on statistical models, =
> drawing on the methodological research on p* and actor-oriented =
> longitudinal models.   Software used will include pnet, statnet,  
> siena, =
> and pajek.  The course is an intensive three-day workshop and it  
> will be =
> taught in Ann Arbor, Michigan, August 17-19, 2011.
>
> course still open
>
> =20
>
>
>     Advanced Network Analysis. The instructor for this course is =
> Jukka-Pekka Onnela, from Harvard University.   The course provides =
> training on how to effectively handle and analyze large scale  
> networks =
> on datasets involving millions of people or data points.  It is a =
> third-level course, and assumes that participants already have =
> experience in the methodology of network analysis at about the level  
> of =
> the second course described above.   The course is an intensive five- 
> day =
> workshop and it will be taught in Ann Arbor, Michigan, June 20-24,  
> 2011.
>
> course still open
>
>
>
>
> More information, including detailed course descriptions, fee  
> schedule, =
> and application forms are available on the ICPSR Summer Program  
> website:
>
>     http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/sumprog/
>
> If you have any further questions about our Network Analysis  
> workshops, =
> or about any other aspect of the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program, please  
> do =
> not hesitate to contact us by e-mail ([log in to unmask]) or =
> telephone (734-763-7400).
>
> We hope that you find these courses to be interesting and relevant  
> to =
> your own work. And, of course, we hope you will be able to  
> participate =
> in at least one of them during the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program!
>
> All best wishes,
>
> William G. Jacoby
> Director, ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of Social =
> Research
> Professor, Department of Political Science, Michigan State University
>
> Dieter Burrell
> Assistant Director, ICPSR Summer Program in Quantitative Methods of =
> Social Research
>
> =20=
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --Apple-Mail-25-694920916
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
> Content-Type: text/html;
>        charset=us-ascii
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> <html><head></head><body style=3D"word-wrap: break-word; =
> -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; =
> "><b><span style=3D"font-size: 14pt; line-height: 21px; font-family: =
> Arial; "><div><b><span style=3D"font-size: 14pt; line-height: 21px; =
> font-family: Arial; "><br></span></b></div><div><b><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 14pt; line-height: 21px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><br></span></b></div>Network analysis workshops in the 2011 ICPSR =
> Summer Program</span></b><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font- 
> size: =
> 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p><br></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" style=3D"font-size: 14px; =
> "><b><i>courses are almost filled .... a few spots remain (see  
> below) =
> .....</i></b></span></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p><br></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" style=3D"font-size: 14px; =
> "><b><i></i></b></span>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p  
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span=
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> ">Greetings from the ICPSR Summer Program!<o:p></o:p></span></p><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height:  
> 14px; =
> font-family: Arial; ">As you know, network analysis is a topic that  
> is =
> receiving an enormous amount of attention in the social and  
> behavioral =
> sciences. This strategy, and the associated methodological tools,  
> for =
> analyzing relationships between entities have proven to be useful in  
> a =
> wide variety of research =
> contexts,&nbsp;<span>&nbsp;</span><span>&nbsp;</span>from many =
> substantive areas. Because of the broad interest in network analysis =
> that exists within the scholarly community, we wanted to let you  
> know =
> about the courses on this topic that we will be offering in the 2011 =
> ICPSR Summer Program.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p  
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial;  
> ">This =
> year, we will be offering a total of five different courses, varying =
> from introductory to advanced levels. The courses will be held in  
> four =
> different locations, and they range in length from three days to  
> four =
> weeks.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial;  
> ">Three =
> of the workshops provide basic introductions to the methodological =
> techniques associated with network analysis. These classes assume  
> that =
> participants have a first course background in statistics, and no  
> prior =
> experience with network analysis.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>The =
> first two are a week long, while the last is a full four-week ICPSR =
> course:<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><b><i>Network Analysis:  
> An =
> Introduction</i></b>. The instructor for this course is Stanley =
> Wasserman, from Indiana University. This workshop has been offered  
> for =
> more than 25 years by ICPSR, and focuses on data, statistics, and =
> models.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>The course is an  
> intensive =
> five-day workshop that will be taught in&nbsp;<b>Ann Arbor,  
> Michigan, =
> June 13-17, =
> 2011.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><o:p></o:p></b></span></ 
> p><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" style=3D"font- 
> family:=
> Arial; font-size: 19px; line-height: 14px; "><b><i>course =
> closed</i></b></span></p><div><br></div><div><br></div><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height:  
> 14px; =
> font-family: Arial; =
> "><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><b><i>Social Network =
> Analysis: An Introduction</i></b>. The instructor for this course is =
> Katherine Faust, from the University of California, Irvine. The  
> course =
> is an intensive five-day workshop, taught in&nbsp;<b>Chapel Hill,  
> North =
> Carolina, July 18-22, 2011.</b></span></p><p  
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><b><o:p></o:p></b></span><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" =
> style=3D"font-family: Arial; font-size: 19px; line-height: 14px; =
> "><b><i>course closed</i></b></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><span><br></span></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><span><br></span></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><b><i>Network =
> Analysis</i></b>. The instructor for this course is Ann McCranie,  
> from =
> Indiana =
> University.&nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Participants  
> will =
> learn about data collection and preparation and methods for analysis  
> of =
> individual actors, subgroup, and network properties; statistical  
> models =
> will be introduced in the last week of the =
> course.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>The course will be taught during the =
> first four-week session of the ICPSR Summer Program,&nbsp;<b>June =
> 20-July 15, 2011, in Ann Arbor, Michigan.<o:p></o:p></b></span></ 
> p><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height:  
> 14px; =
> font-family: Arial; "><b><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" =
> style=3D"font-weight: normal; font-size: 19px; "><b><i>course =
> closed</i></b></span></b></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial;  
> ">The =
> last two workshops cover more advanced topics in the standard  
> methods of =
> network analysis. They assume that participants have had exposure  
> to, =
> and some experience with, the methodology of network =
> analysis:<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><b><i>Network Analysis:  
> A =
> Second Course</i></b>. The instructors for this course are Stanley =
> Wasserman, from Indiana University and Hank Green from the RAND  
> Graduate =
> School.&nbsp;<span>&nbsp;</span>This course will focus on  
> statistical =
> models, drawing on the methodological research =
> on&nbsp;<i>p*</i>&nbsp;and actor-oriented longitudinal =
> models.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Software used will =
> include&nbsp;<i>pnet, statnet, siena, and =
> pajek.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></i>The course is an intensive three- 
> day =
> workshop and it will be taught in&nbsp;<b>Ann Arbor, Michigan,  
> August =
> 17-19, 2011</b>.<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><b><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" style=3D"font-weight: normal; =
> font-size: 19px; "><b><i>course still =
> open</i></b></span></b></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p><div><br></div><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><b><i><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line- 
> height: =
> 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>Advanced Network =
> Analysis</span></i></b><i><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line- 
> height: =
> 14px; font-family: Arial; ">.</span></i><span style=3D"font-size:  
> 10pt; =
> line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; ">&nbsp;The instructor for  
> this =
> course is Jukka-Pekka Onnela, from Harvard =
> University.&nbsp;<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>The course provides  
> training =
> on how to effectively handle and analyze large scale networks on =
> datasets involving millions of people or data =
> points.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>It is a third-level course, and  
> assumes =
> that participants already have experience in the methodology of  
> network =
> analysis at about the level of the second course described =
> above.<span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span>The course is an intensive five- 
> day =
> workshop and it will be taught in&nbsp;<b>Ann Arbor, Michigan, June =
> 20-24, 2011.</b><o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" =
> style=3D"font-family: Arial; font-size: 13px; line-height: 14px; =
> "><b><span class=3D"Apple-style-span" style=3D"font-weight: normal; =
> font-size: 19px; "><b><i>course still =
> open</i></b></span></b></span></p><div><br></div><div><br></ 
> div><div><br><=
> /div><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line- 
> height: =
> 14px; font-family: Arial; ">More information, including detailed  
> course =
> descriptions, fee schedule, and application forms are available on  
> the =
> ICPSR Summer Program website:<o:p></o:p></span></p><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height:  
> 14px; =
> font-family: Arial; "><span>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a =
> href=3D"http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/sumprog/">http://www.icpsr.umich.edu/su=
> mprog/</a><o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial;  
> ">If =
> you have any further questions about our Network Analysis workshops,  
> or =
> about any other aspect of the 2011 ICPSR Summer Program, please do  
> not =
> hesitate to contact us by e-mail (<a =
> href=3D"mailto:[log in to unmask]">[log in to unmask]</a>)  
> or =
> telephone (734-763-7400).<o:p></o:p></span></p><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height:  
> 14px; =
> font-family: Arial; ">We hope that you find these courses to be =
> interesting and relevant to your own work. And, of course, we hope  
> you =
> will be able to participate in at least one of them during the 2011 =
> ICPSR Summer Program!<o:p></o:p></span></p><p  
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial;  
> ">All =
> best wishes,<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> ">William G. Jacoby<br>Director, ICPSR Summer Program in  
> Quantitative =
> Methods of Social Research<br>Professor, Department of Political =
> Science, Michigan State University<o:p></o:p></span></p><p =
> class=3D"MsoNormal"><span style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height:  
> 14px; =
> font-family: Arial; ">Dieter Burrell<br>Assistant Director, ICPSR  
> Summer =
> Program in Quantitative Methods of Social =
> Research<o:p></o:p></span></p><p class=3D"MsoNormal"><span =
> style=3D"font-size: 10pt; line-height: 14px; font-family: Arial; =
> "><o:p>&nbsp;</o:p></span></p></body></html>=
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> --Apple-Mail-25-694920916--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Date:    Thu, 9 Jun 2011 08:56:35 +1000
> From:    Shahadat Uddin <[log in to unmask]>
> Subject: Looking for papers
>
> This is a multi-part message in MIME format.
>
> ------_=_NextPart_001_01CC262F.514E84F7
> Content-Type: text/plain;
>        charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
>
> Dear All,
> =20
> I am looking for papers that link communication structure and crisis =
> within an organization or some other context.=20
> =20
> I remember I read a paper (abstract) saying that during crisis =
> communication structure become less hierarchical. In that paper, it  
> was =
> also proved that during crisis communication structure become more =
> circular. They also argued that as communication structure become  
> more =
> circular the organizational structure become less hierarchical.=20
> =20
> Could anyone identify this paper as well as any other paper in this =
> context!! Please let me know. Thanks in advance for kind support.
> =20
> Regards
> Shahadat=20
>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
>
> ------_=_NextPart_001_01CC262F.514E84F7
> Content-Type: text/html;
>        charset="iso-8859-1"
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
>
> *****  To join INSNA, visit http://www.insna.org  *****
> <HTML dir=3Dltr><HEAD>=0A=
> <META http-equiv=3DContent-Type content=3D"text/html;  
> charset=3Dunicode">=0A=
> <META content=3D"MSHTML 6.00.2900.6082" name=3DGENERATOR></HEAD>=0A=
> <BODY>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial color=3D#000000 size=3D2>Dear All,</FONT></ 
> DIV>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>I am looking for papers that link =
> communication structure and crisis within an organization or some  
> other =
> context. </FONT></DIV>=0A=
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>I remember I read a paper =
> (abstract)&nbsp;saying that during crisis  
> communication&nbsp;structure =
> become less hierarchical.&nbsp;In that paper, it was  
> also&nbsp;proved =
> that during crisis&nbsp;communication structure become more  
> circular. =
> They also argued that as communication structure become&nbsp;more =
> circular&nbsp;the organizational structure become less hierarchical. =
> </FONT></DIV>=0A=
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Could anyone identify this paper as =
> well as any other paper in this context!!&nbsp;Please let me know. =
> Thanks in advance for kind&nbsp;support.</FONT></DIV>=0A=
> <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial size=3D2>Regards</FONT></DIV>=0A=
> <DIV><FONT face=3DArial =
> size=3D2>Shahadat</FONT>&nbsp;</DIV></BODY></HTML>
> _____________________________________________________________________
> SOCNET is a service of INSNA, the professional association for social
> network researchers (http://www.insna.org). To unsubscribe, send
> an email message to [log in to unmask] containing the line
> UNSUBSCRIBE SOCNET in the body of the message.
> ------_=_NextPart_001_01CC262F.514E84F7--
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of SOCNET Digest - 7 Jun 2011 to 8 Jun 2011 (#2011-140)
> ***********************************************************

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